The Myth of a Christian Nation: An Introduction

 This post begins a series on Greg Boyd’s book The Myth of a Christian Nation.

The thesis of the book is something that many of us don’t want to hear, but which we despirately need to hear: many American Christians are guilty of nationalistic and political idolatry. Our understanding of God’s kingdom, he says, has become polluted with political ideas, agendas, and issues. More specifically, he will tell us, we need to let go of a foundational myth that America is a Chrisitan nation. When we align our theology with our political ideology, believing that “God is on our side” in our country’s conflicts and policy decisions, we have sold out God’s true kingdom, which trasncends national self-interest and political borders, and which does not seek to use force to impose its way on others.

Boyd is not the sort-of person that you would expect to generate a book of this nature. He is not an emergent writer, nor is he a traditional theological liberal from a mainline protestant church. He is not a Jim Wallis-esque political activist. He is a relatively conservative evangelical minister, who takes great care to tie his theses into scripture in the traditional, evangelical style.

I will be blogging along as I read the book, so I haven’t finished it yet. But everything I have read so far is well worth considering.

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9 Responses to The Myth of a Christian Nation: An Introduction

  1. GKB says:

    How appropriate to begin this series on Memorial Day…

  2. Matt says:

    Yeah, I thought about that. And here’s the thing:

    I don’t mean any disrespect to people who have lost family members in military conflict. The purpose of this post isn’t to insult members of the military or ex-members of the military, most of whom want and try to be honorable people.

    But I do think its appropriate, even on a day that involves national recognition of those who have served and died in the military, to invite everyone to reflect on the most appropriate, healthy way of understanding the relationship between national interests (particularly as they are expressed in military force) and Christian discipleship.

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